Your Attic Is Not The Only Place You Need To Insulate

Hello, my name is Emily Green. Welcome to my website about home maintenance and repairs performed by general contractors. When I bought my first house, absolutely everything was in perfect condition. After living there for several months, however, I started to notice a slight decline in the finishes of certain materials in my house. I suspected that the items needed care, but I did not know how to proceed. A general contractor helped me learn everything I needed to know about home maintenance and repairs. I created this site to share this knowledge with my readers. Come by again soon to learn more.

Your Attic Is Not The Only Place You Need To Insulate

Your Attic Is Not The Only Place You Need To Insulate

23 August 2016
 Categories:
Construction & Contractors, Blog


When you think of insulating your home, the attic is probably the first place that comes to mind. While a well insulated attic is certainly key to keeping your home comfortable and keeping your energy bills in check, there are other areas in your home that may not be as well insulated as they need to be. Focusing on improving the insulation in these areas will go a long way towards making your home more efficient.

Behind cabinets and cupboard.

In your kitchen, the walls behind the cupboards and cabinets may not be very well insulated since builders need to run a lot of pipes and electrical cords through these walls. You can make up for this deficiency by having some blown-in insulation put through the walls. Your contractor will only need to make a small hole in an inconspicuous area to blow in the fluffy insulation. It wills settle around any pipes and cords that run through the walls, serving as a better heat barrier.

Your windows.

Glass is notorious for being a bad insulator. No matter what you do, you're going to lose some heat through your windows. But there are plenty of simple ways to insulate your windows and reduce heat transfer.

  • Invest in insulating curtains, and close them when the temperature drops. They'll serve as a barrier between your warm home and the cold outdoors.
  • Purchase sticky plastic sheets to place over your windows. They'll stop heat transfer and prevent cold air from leaking in.
  • Press rope caulk into the groove between your window sash and window frame to prevent cold air from blowing through.

Underneath the door.

Doors themselves tend to be pretty well insulated, but the gap below your door is probably not. You can block cold air from leaking in underneath the door with a simple door snake. This is a long, stuffed tube that you just place at the base of the door. You can kick it out of the way when you need to open the door, and then put it back in place later on. If your door has a rubberized piece at the bottom, also keep an eye on this piece and replace it if it starts getting dinged or starts peeling away from the door. You'll usually just need to peel the old one off and push the new one into place.

 With the tips above, your whole home will be better insulated against the cold. For assistance, talk to a professional like Mincin Insulation Service Inc.

About Me
Learning About Home Maintenance and Repairs

Hello, my name is Emily Green. Welcome to my website about home maintenance and repairs performed by general contractors. When I bought my first house, absolutely everything was in perfect condition. After living there for several months, however, I started to notice a slight decline in the finishes of certain materials in my house. I suspected that the items needed care, but I did not know how to proceed. A general contractor helped me learn everything I needed to know about home maintenance and repairs. I created this site to share this knowledge with my readers. Come by again soon to learn more.

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